Friday, 22 September 2017

BOOKCLUB: The Keeper of Lost Things by Ruth Hogan

This month on the Triskele Book Club, we're discussing The Keeper of Lost Things, by Ruth Hogan.

About the book: Once a celebrated author of short stories now in his twilight years, Anthony Peardew has spent half his life collecting lost objects, trying to atone for a promise broken many years before.
Realising he is running out of time, he leaves his house and all its lost treasures to his assistant Laura, the one person he can trust to fulfil his legacy and reunite the thousands of objects with their rightful owners.
But the final wishes of the 'Keeper of Lost Things' have unforeseen repercussions which trigger a most serendipitous series of encounters...


I thought there was something completely captivating about this novel from the first page to the last and couldn't believe it was a debut novel. What appealed to you about Ruth Hogan's style?

(GH)  I think the feeling of confidence that comes from 'good' writing, whether a debut novel or not. Confidence in the story, confidence in the characters, and confidence to deliver a satisfying read to their audience.

(JJ) I agree about the confidence. There's a gentle rhythm to the way she writes and you just know you are in good hands.

(LP) I enjoyed Ruth Hogan's charming, fairytale style of storytelling; the way she quietly moves you.

I would class this as my 'comfort read' of 2017 so far - did you feel the same?

(GH) Yes, although I came to the novel believing it would be quite a sad read, touching on love, loss and grief. And while there was certainly elements in there, it also had numerous touching and moving moments, glimpses of humour and jealousy, and a lot of happiness and awakening of minds. A real balance that couldn't help but put a smile on the reader's face.

(LP) Yes, I found this a quite a soothing kind of read, the heartwarming moments nicely balancing out the tragic moments.

(JJ) Exactly. Very human and although it takes in the sadness of loss, it was uplifting and left you feeling positive towards the rest of the species.

Although this is essentially a story of loss - from Anthony's wife to the assortment of lost items - it is also a 'feel good' book with more highs then lows - which is a clever balance. How do you think the author achieved her goal?

(GH)  It felt to me that the reader simply connected with her characters and let them get on with telling their story. That may sound simple, but it is anything but. However, I feel the writer was so in tune with the novel that she let the highs and lows write themselves. If it feels right to the author, it will feel right to the reader, and everything fitted perfectly in place here.

(LP) Yes, I did relate to it more as a "feel good" book, perhaps because of the clever, quirky moments, in particular with Sunshine, some of which were "laugh out loud".

(JJ) Well yes, there is loss but also recovery or at least learning to live with the absence. Plus the characters handle their misfortune in many different ways. Sunshine is certainly an endearing personality and wholly unpredictable.

The author examines many sides of human nature, using the lost items as a catalyst for each story, which I thought was uniquely clever. Did you enjoy this narrative - and could you name another book with similar structure?

(GH) I really enjoyed the narrative structure. I liked how the 'lost things' became plot points. And one of the main reasons I liked it was the uniqueness. I cannot think of a similar book!

(LP) Yes I too loved this unique narrative and can't think of another similar book.

(JJ) I've read/seen stories which feature items threading their way through different peoples lives, but not across such a range of time and place. The structure was perfect, with each sub-story retaining its own atmosphere.

Which was your favourite character - and why?

(GH) I'd like to say Sunshine but that's probably a little unoriginal. So, I'll say Anthony Peardew because without him there would be no story.

(LP): I didn't have a favourite. They were all enjoyable, unique and interesting in their own way.

(JJ) Eunice, I'd say. From a modern-day perspective, you could say she's not a great role model, but I admired her quiet dignity and generous heart.

The author carefully handled Sunshine as a character, not shying away from her Downs' Syndrome, but using it as a positive rather than negative trait. Did this work for you?

(GH) Sunshine lived up to her name. She brought an unpretentious quality to the story. Her simple honesty and genuine highs and lows were refreshing against the muddied lives of the other characters.

(LP) Very much so, as Gillian says, her child's innocence was a welcome break from the sadness.

(JJ) And rightly so. There's no self-pity in Sunshine, but a huge optimism and expectation of welcome. I thought she was great fun and a good lesson to many of us.

There was an element of the supernatural, particularly centred around Sunshine, that added an unexpected layer to the story for me. Did you feel the same?

(GH) I liked it but then I like books with an extra paranormal edge, and to be honest it felt perfectly natural to me that Sunshine would have a connection with the lost things. I felt as if Anthony always knew this, and it was all part of his big plan.

(LP) This was the only element of the story that I didn't really relate to. I found it a bit intrusive and not really necessary. However, it certainly did not spoil the story for me.

(JJ) I tend to agree with Liza there. The positive, moving-on thrust of the book was imbalanced by that particular thread. But we can't all love every element or it would be very dull.

There was little use of location in the book, except for Anthony's home, Padua. Did the description of the house and garden bring the setting alive to you?

(GH) I'm usually a big advocate of the use of location within a story. But Padua is the focus of the story so it didn't detract here.

(JJ) Padua would be my second favourite character. That's what got me looking for all the Shakespearian allusions, too.

(LP) Yes, I certainly felt "at home" at Padua, and could imagine it clearly in my mind's eye; even smell it!

One of my highlights was the mini stories inside the main plot - essentially the story of the lost things - did you enjoy these breakaway insights or did they detract from the main plot for you?

(GH) I loved them! Each little tale brought a smile (or tear) to my face. I thought it was so clever to sit and think about each item and bring to life the story behind it. It was one of most favourite things about the novel.

(LP) I agree with Gillian; I loved them!

(JJ) They were great fun and encouraged the reader to imagine what stories the other objects in Anthony's study might tell. It also relieved some of the  pressure on the main narratives, having some of these side stories to explore.

Many readers may not have heard of Ruth Hogan. Readers of which other authors do you think would enjoy this novel? Why should they give it a try?

(GH) I think it's a tribute to the author and the book that no names spring to mind! But I would say that Kate Hamer has a similar literary style, examining the tiny details and letting the bigger picture come to life by its own accord. But anyone who likes a modern day psychological thriller but with a more gentle pace would appreciate Hogan's writing.

(LP) Despite the fact that this is a very unique novel, a few authors who examine the finer details spring to mind, such as Kate Atkinson, Ann Patchett and Maggie O'Farrell.

(JJ) It does what it says on the cover - it's a feel-good story, perfect for when the nights start drawing in. Hogan's writing reminded me a little of Jojo Moyes in the way she handles emotion. I found it a cathartic read when managing a loss of my own.

Read an interview with Ruth Hogan here.

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